The Intersection of Guns and Domestic Violence

By Chelsea Parsons
Director, Crime and Firearms Policy, Center for American Progress

The issue of domestic violence has received a lot of attention in recent weeks, in large part due to the Ray Rice case. Millions of Americans saw the graphic video depicting the type of violence against an intimate partner that usually occurs only behind closed doors. That case has brought home to many across the country a fact that domestic violence prevention advocates confront every day: domestic violence remains prevalent in the United States. While violent crime in this country has steadily declined over the past two decades, a significant proportion of the violence that remains occurs in the context of domestic or intimate partner violence, a burden that overwhelmingly falls on women. Although women are murdered less frequently than men, they are much more likely to be killed by domestic or intimate partners than men are. From 2001 to 2012, 6,410 women were murdered in the U.S. by an intimate partner using a gun—more than the total number of U.S. troops killed in action during the entirety of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan combined.

#WorkAgainstViolence: Domestic Violence

By Qudsia Raja
Advocacy & Policy Manager of Health and Safety, YWCA USA

By now, you’ve likely seen the video of former NFL player Ray Rice brutally assaulting his then-fiancé Janay Rice and then dragging her unconscious out of an elevator. While everyone has been talking about this particular incident, domestic violence is a systemic problem.

This incident has inadvertently sparked much-needed conversation on the pervasive nature of violence against women. However, what many people don’t know is that if the news cycle were to accurately reflect the prevalence of domestic violence in the United States, you would hear about a new incident every 15 seconds. Ray Rice used his fist. But increasingly men are using guns. Every month, 46 women are victims of domestic violence related homicides in the U.S.

Recognizing the Importance of the Violence Against Women Act on Its 20th Anniversary

By Hannah Brinson
Violence Prevention Project Coordinator, YWCA Knoxville

Hannah Brinson

Hannah Brinson

This Saturday marks the 20th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, or VAWA. VAWA was enacted in 1994 and includes measures to keep victims safe, and to hold perpetrators accountable. Here at the YWCA in Knoxville, Tennessee, the funding provided by VAWA has revolutionized our preventative and victim advocacy services. As we celebrate the anniversary of VAWA, we are particularly excited about a program VAWA funding allows us to offer to our community.

The Top 10 Questions to Ask About Your Title IX Rights on a College Visit

By Michaela Olson
Intern, NWLC

‘Tis the season for college visiting. As campuses across America are flooded with high school students this summer, there are some hard-hitting, crucial questions to keep in mind—and they may help to give you better perspective on where you could spend some of the most formative years of your life. Although it might not occur to many prospective students and their parents, one of those questions is how a school responds to reports of sexual harassment and assault. While it’s been in the news a lot lately, campus sexual assault isn’t just a hot topic or fodder for politicians and pundits, but rather a harsh reality for far too many. The more you know about how each school responds to it, the better.

YWCA of Queens Attends UN Women Global Launch of Beijing+20

By Jane Lee
Communications & Outreach Associate, YWCA of Queens

From left: YWCA Queens HSE Students Umme Sheuli, Moises Churio, Adrian Lezcano, Director of Center for Education & Career Services Stacy Mckelvey, Communications & Outreach Associate Jane Lee, and HSE Student Erick Menendez at the Apollo Theatre in New York

From left: YWCA Queens HSE Students Umme Sheuli, Moises Churio, Adrian Lezcano, Director of Center for Education & Career Services Stacy Mckelvey, Communications & Outreach Associate Jane Lee, and HSE Student Erick Menendez at the Apollo Theatre in New York

The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women launched its year-long Beijing+20 Empowering Women, Empowering Humanity: Picture it! campaign on Thursday, June 26, 2014. The campaign is a year-long movement with the mission of cultivating global dialogue and actions on women’s rights and gender equality. Several staff and students from the YWCA of Queens attended the Beijing+20 launch event at the Apollo Theatre in New York City. Our High School Equivalency (HSE/GED) students were eager to listen to the amazing line-up of speakers and performers, ranging from the UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka to noted feminist leader and activist Gloria Steinem.

An Opportunity to Make a Difference

by Danielle Desrosiers
Direct Care Supervisor, Survivor Outreach and Advocacy Services, YWCA Western Massachusetts

Danielle Desrosiers

An open letter to the YWCA community and beyond:

I am writing to you as a member of our community and as someone who has had the privilege of working with survivors of sexual assault for the past five years. In those five years, I have experienced heartbreak, unbelievable pain and trauma beyond words, but most importantly I have experienced an unwavering strength that tethers it all together.

Men have the power to end violence against women

By Patricia Glaser Shea
President and CEO, YWCA Nashville & Middle Tennessee 

shea0621

Patricia Glaser Shea

Nearly nine months ago, domestic violence victim advocates stood proudly in front of the Metro Courthouse as our city’s leaders presented recommendations for system-wide improvements to Nashville’s response to domestic violence. The recommendations came after Mayor Karl Dean commissioned and completed a domestic violence safety and accountability assessment and shed a bright light on the gaps in our community’s legal, judicial and law enforcement practices.

Recap: YWCA NCA Capitol Hill Day

By Tamika L. Gittens
Contributing Blogger, YWCA NCA

Did you know that 85% of domestic violence victims are women? (Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief, Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001, February 2003)

The YWCA National Capital Area recently participated with several other YWCA associations across the nation for Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill to talk about domestic violence, an issue plaguing local and national communities. In an effort to demonstrate the damaging and permanent effects that domestic violence has on women and children, we engaged Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Md.), and Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) in discussions on gun violence and its impact on domestic violence. We shared statistics to help them reexamine current laws pertaining to ownership of firearms, and the need for more policies and programs to safeguard and support victims.

To Be Cured of HIV

For about a year, there has been much discussion about the possibility of a cure for HIV. Visit POZ’s website to learn more about the many different aspects to this conversation.

For BABES Network-YWCA’s summer newsletter, we asked the question: What would it be like to be cured of HIV?

Some people in our community have been living with HIV for 6 months and some have been HIV+ for 30 years. Each person’s life has been impacted by their HIV diagnosis in different ways and have done their best to live healthy and engaged lives. Being cured of HIV is not something BABES Network has often thought about – but now that we could possibly have a cure in 10 years, we think it’s important to consider what that would mean for us as individuals and for our communities.

Women & Incarceration: A Crucial Conversation in Cambridge and Beyond

By Anna J. Weick
Administrative Assistant, YWCA Cambridge

“[Prisons] are not places for human beings with spirits inside of them” – Andrea James

Anna Weick

Anna Weick

In the past 30 years, women have become the fastest-growing incarcerated population in the United States, and activists in Cambridge are determined to fight for alternatives.