The Intersection of Poverty and Domestic Violence

By Lecia Imbery
Senior Policy Writer, Coalition on Human Needs

Lecia Imbery

Lecia Imbery

We know that poverty disproportionately affects women and single moms. In 2013, nearly 16 percent of women and nearly 40 percent of families with children headed by a woman lived in poverty, higher than their male counterparts. We know that women who are poor are more likely to suffer from health problems and are more likely to be survivors of domestic violence. We also know that children who grow up poor are more likely to suffer from health issues, developmental delays, behavioral problems, lower academic achievement, and unemployment in adulthood. If we fail to address poverty, particularly amongst women and children, we only perpetuate the cycle of poverty, inequality, and domestic violence.

YWCA of Queens Attends UN Women Global Launch of Beijing+20

By Jane Lee
Communications & Outreach Associate, YWCA of Queens

From left: YWCA Queens HSE Students Umme Sheuli, Moises Churio, Adrian Lezcano, Director of Center for Education & Career Services Stacy Mckelvey, Communications & Outreach Associate Jane Lee, and HSE Student Erick Menendez at the Apollo Theatre in New York

From left: YWCA Queens HSE Students Umme Sheuli, Moises Churio, Adrian Lezcano, Director of Center for Education & Career Services Stacy Mckelvey, Communications & Outreach Associate Jane Lee, and HSE Student Erick Menendez at the Apollo Theatre in New York

The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women launched its year-long Beijing+20 Empowering Women, Empowering Humanity: Picture it! campaign on Thursday, June 26, 2014. The campaign is a year-long movement with the mission of cultivating global dialogue and actions on women’s rights and gender equality. Several staff and students from the YWCA of Queens attended the Beijing+20 launch event at the Apollo Theatre in New York City. Our High School Equivalency (HSE/GED) students were eager to listen to the amazing line-up of speakers and performers, ranging from the UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka to noted feminist leader and activist Gloria Steinem.

Rochester’s History of Strong Women Continues Today

By Jean Carroll, President & CEO
YWCA Rochester & Monroe County

Jean Carroll

March is designated as “Women’s History Month,” and I’m honored to live and work in a city that has such a rich history of strong, powerful, influential women. Rochester, New York is where Susan B. Anthony lived, worked and campaigned for women’s rights.

In 1872, Anthony and several other women voted (illegally at the time) in the Presidential election. She was found guilty and ordered to pay a $100 fine (which she never paid). 14 years after she died, women were granted the right to vote with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. The goal of equality and empowerment for all women continues today, and a recent poverty report issued about Rochester shows we have a long way to go.

Creative Solutions to Difficult Issues: Working Around the System

By Danielle Marse-Kapr
Senior Advocacy and Policy Associate

This week, I had the honor of attending the 58th United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). While the CSW occurs over the course of two weeks, NGOs from around the world lobby their representatives in support of the issues most impacting the women they represent. And, while the CSW debates these points, NGOs plan “side events” where they gather to discuss women’s issues from every perspective – safety, poverty, health, political rights, etc.

Danielle (third from right), with panelists from YWCAs in Australia, New Zealand, Malawi, and Palestine, discussing young women's leadership.

Danielle (third from right), with panelists from YWCAs in Australia, New Zealand, Malawi, and Palestine, discussing young women’s leadership.

Live from the 58th UN Commission on the Status of Women

By Desiree Hoffman
Director of Advocacy, YWCA USA

It’s that time of year again. Non-governmental organizations (NGO’s) from around the world, Representatives of Member States and UN entities have arrived in New York City to attend the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). The UN CSW was established in 1946 – 1 year after the UN was created. The YWCA has been involved in the UN CSW since its inception.

CSW photos

YWCA participants at the UN CSW

How Key Tax Credits Promote Economic Empowerment

By Roxy Caines
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

While the beginning of March means that spring is almost here, it also represents the midway point of the tax season, and a good time to highlight the importance to women and families of the Earned Income Credit (EIC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC), federal tax benefits for people who work. In addition to helping taxpayers meet their basic needs such as groceries, utilities, and other bills, the credits can also put eligible workers on the path to securing better housing, dependable transportation, and quality child care, pursuing higher education, or covering out-of-pocket health care costs. The EIC and CTC lifted an estimated 10.1 million people out of poverty, including 2.8 million women and 5.3 million children, in 2012.

Top Five on Friday: January 17

By Katie Stanton
Social Media & Online Engagement Manager, YWCA USA

This week, the news cycle has been incredibly female-focused. From politics to health, from birthdays to marriage. Read on for the latest stories about women this week, and if we missed anything important, let us know in the comments!

1. A look at trends in life expectancy and economic status showed that women in the U.S. are dying sooner than those in other countries, and the reason may be linked to their education and access to healthcare.

Why American Women Aren’t Living as Long as They Should, by Olga Khazan, The Atlantic

A Woman’s Nation: Helping Women Find Opportunity

By Katie Stanton
Social Media and Online Engagement Manager, YWCA USA

It’s with great interest that I’ve followed the media storm surround the release of the Shriver Center’s newest report, A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink. Over 3,000 adults were polled, including low-income women, to find out their views and opinions on “the economy, gender, marriage, education, and the future.”

Despite the progress of women economically and otherwise, there is still a long way to go. Check out just some of the data gleaned from the report:

Top Five on Friday – Sept. 20

By Katie Stanton
Social Media & Online Engagement Manager, YWCA USA

Last night, the House of Representatives narrowly approved cutting funding to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by $40 billion in a bill that would remove nearly four million Americans from receiving assistance.

As the looming Congressional fight over government spending approaches, the YWCA will continue to advocate for policies and bills like SNAP that will support women and their families. We hope you’ll join us!

1. More and more Americans are turning to food stamps each day, despite the economic recovery.

Hunger by the Numbers

By Bread for the World

Roughly 49 million Americans don’t know where their next meal is coming from. (Film still from A Place at The Table, courtesy of Participant Media)

Roughly 49 million Americans don’t know where their next meal is coming from. (Film still from A Place at The Table, courtesy of Participant Media)

One thing is for certain—the Great Recession and its aftermath have provided us with a lot of numbers, few of them encouraging.

  • 63.2 percent of people in the U.S. have a job or are actively seeking work — the lowest labor force percentage since 1978.
  • 10 percent was the peak unemployment rate in October 2009, and dropped to 7.6 percent as of May 2013.  Today there are three unemployed people for every job opening.